#2
I heard about Snapchat going public today...Do you think Snapchat has longevity? Personally most of my friends have deleted it, I have doubts whether it will last anywhere near as long as Facebook etc. Facebook sell all our data to companies for targeted products, and thats how they make the fortune. I just dont see what Snapchat can really offer past its existing model.



Instagram (owned by Facebook), already offers basically all the services Snapchat does (minus the amusing face filters), and has 600M users. Snapchat has 100M.



I think it will soon go in the way of Vine, where people get bored and just stop using it.



For that reason, I wouldn't go near their shares.

#3
a) yes, quite a few ISA providers allow you to buy US listed stocks. You'll probably need to fill out a W8-BEN form at some point to indicate to US authorities that you are a foreigner owning shares. Not a big deal to do, just a bit of official book keeping



b) Snap is a business. The question is can it make money, otherwise it is worthless. Google & Facebook have the online ad market cornered so it's a hard market to elbow in to

#4
The majority of Snapchat users are under 21, most of whom are not in employment yet i.e. little or no money to spend.



People are already getting bored - my nieces (all under 15) have pretty much stopped using it and only check it out for new filters. 24 billion for some dog ears? Not for me thanks.

#5
Snapchats valuation is based on them delivering full screen video and audio in peoples snapfeeds rather than the more (maybe not so) subtle banners in Facebook but at least they are easy to scroll past.



This will work more like a traditional ad break and similar to the annoying ads at the start of youtube videos. This has the potential to put a lot of users off if its too intrusive. Look at Twitter - its lost 70% of its value since its IPO, I think you could see an initial spike in the share price but then a steady decline if the adverts push users away from the platform.

#9
There is no such thing as a "cheap" way of putting a tiny investment of £1,000 all into a single US share. A) Because dealing costs and fixed costs are likely to eat up a disproportionate share of your investment B) Because of the very high chance of losing money.

#10
A stocks and shares ISA restricts your ability to hold foreign shares. In particular, you are only allowed to hold ETFs that are based in the UK, and are only allowed to hold shares that are listed on exchanges that are approved by HMRC.



I have both a trading account and an ISA with TD Direct, and can hold these investments in the trading account but not the ISA.



In any case, the only advantage of an ISA is that it saves you the tax that you would otherwise pay on any gains above your personal allowances, and on an investment of just a thousand pounds (or even ten thousand pounds) you are not going to get anywhere near using up your personal allowance.

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