#11



This particular guy was saying that he used to work in McDonalds until he got into Binary. And now here he was getting stopped by this female presenter because he is driving a supercar and is apparently very wealthy.
Originally posted by jdw2000


I drive a £500, 15 year old family car, not a supercar. Does that make me apparently poor? Or does I mean I'm not spending money on things that will lose value.

#12



I drive a £500, 15 year old family car, not a supercar. Does that make me apparently poor? Or does I mean I'm not spending money on things that will lose value.
Originally posted by jimjames


I'm just saying what was on the program. I'm with you on all that, though. I don't even own a car.

#14





The clever part is that they have two mailing lists, and they tell one half of their mugs to go long and the other half to go short, which means that they are guaranteed that with any given bet 50% of their client base will be happy. Which, while not high enough for the mugs to make money (the house margin means that as ever they lose money on average with every trade), is high enough to keep them on the hook.
Originally posted by Malthusian


I used to enjoy the tv show minder when I was a kid, dating me I know.



One episode had Arthur putting an ad for guaranteed racing tips in the local paper and then getting a few people to occupy telephone boxes to take the calls, gave out random horses and just asked that if successful the lucky punter send them a postal order for 10% of the winnings.



It actually sounds quite innocent, after all no money up front, only oay when you win, but it's a scam that goes back decades or probably centuries.



Binary options is no different to the two guys in a prison cell betting in the fly crawling up the wall, well it is as at least one of them will make a bit of money and there's no dodgy middleman involved.

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